German Surnames
Beginning with V

Here we will study the meanings of German surnames beginning with V.



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V

Valentin – ‘Saint Valentine’ was the name of numerous saints of ancient Rome. The name derives from the Latin word ‘valens’ which means ‘worthy / strong / healthy.’

Vater – This German surname means ‘father’ in English. It most likely originally described either a ‘father figure’ in a town or village, a counselor or, simply, a person others ‘looked up to’ and ‘sought advice from’.

Veith / Veit – Made popular by Saint Veit (‘Saint Vitus’ in English) who is patron saint of comedians, actors and dancers and also protects against lightning. In the Middle Ages in Germany it was tradition to celebrate the feast of Saints Vitus by dancing around his statue.

Velten – This German surname is a variation of ‘Valentin’. Please see ‘Valentin’ listed above for further information.

Vetter – Stemming from the Middle High German word ‘vetere’, this German surname would have originally referred to a ‘father’s brother’ or a ‘cousin’.

Vogel / Vogl / Vogler – This German surname means ‘bird’ in English and would have originally been the occupational name for a ‘bird catcher’ or ‘bird dealer’, or, alternatively, a nickname for someone who enjoyed singing.

Vogt / Voigt – Deriving from the Middle High German word ‘voget’, this German surname was originally the occupational name for a ‘legal advisor’, ‘civil servant’, ‘court official’ and for a ‘manager/ supervisor’ in general.

Volk / Volkmann / Voelkel / Volkel / Völkel – These German surnames are all variations of the Old High German ‘Volkhart‘ where ‘Volk‘ meant ‘people / nation / folk‘ and ‘hart‘ meant ‘hard / strong’. Thus, essentially this German surname means ‘strong nation/people’.

Volker / Völker / Voelker – Stemming from the old Germanic person name ‘Volkher’ (‘volk-heri’) where ‘volk‘ meant ‘people / nation / folk’ and ‘her’ meant ‘army’. Thus, essentially this German surname means ‘people’s army’.

Volkmar / Vollmer – This German surname stems from the Old High German ‘folk-mari’ where ‘folk’ meant ‘nation / people / folk’ and ‘mari’ meant ‘famous / well-known’. Thus, this name means ‘famous (among) people’.

Volz – This German surname is a short form of ‘Volkmar’. Please see ‘Volkmar’ listed above for further information. 

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